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Is it wise to judge create-a-line contest on votes?

posted by SurplusGamer on - last edited - Viewed by 1.6K users
I know that there are all sorts of rules stopping the utterly WRONG making it into the game as a result of the current contest running...

... but when the top two entries are suddenly from someone who goes by the name 'The Silent Man', which were nowhere to be seen before... well...

What I'm trying to say is that it suddenly seems as if the winner will be the person who somehow manages to badger enough people to click on the Vote button (or cheat - not that I'm accusing anyone of that) rather than the person who actually has the line that everyone thinks is the best.

Those top two lines are not TERRIBLE by any means, but either I'm missing something and that guy has managed to create the TWO funniest lines in the contest which everyone loves so much that they've both suddenly rocketed to the top out of nowhere, or there's something else going on here.

Thoughts?
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  • Again, you are missing my point. I hate to go over it again, so I'll try to explain myself properly this time.

    Please be reassured, I did get your point the first time around. But I disagree with it. It's not because someone doesn't agree with you he necessarily didn't understand, you know :p

    However I think humor can't be compared to morality because every civilization shares a common ground to what is seen as right or wrong (giving to the poor is "good", stealing is "bad"...). Without those moral rules, civilization cannot exist. On the other hand, humour depends on education, historical background of the country, the person's life, and so on. When an american do a joke about lawyers, his fellow americans will find it funny (or not) but at least they will get it. A french or british or german, where the legal system works differently, will just rise an eyebrow.
    I was using a simplified example to illustrate a principle, like I did above. This is a perfectly valid thing to do, in fact it's essential for our understanding of concepts. The fact that there are 3000 entries doesn't change the general principle that a greater number of people will tend find certain lines funnier than others, something which is likely to become obfuscated by peoples' resourcefulness in getting votes.

    But what you seem to overlook is the fact that only works if people can read all the entries *at once* (i.e. same chances for every entry).

    From the moment people have to do a bit of research to read more entries, those entries have no way to win (because, as marketing teach us, people are lazy, and on the internet they are lazier.)

    The basics of statistics is also to have the same conditions for everyone. In the current form of the contest, it is not the case.
    I can't remember if I proposed this before - I think I did - but wouldn't it be easier to take a certain number of the top entries, say 10 of them and then judging by committee? It's not perfect, but at least it raises the chances of ending up with a line that fits the tone of the game.

    As I said earlier, I agree with that idea, but as I said you don't change the rules of a contest halfway through, that would be unfair. However, as someone else said in this thread, it would be nice to have actually two winners : the "telltale choice" AND the "popular choice".
  • SAT'S NUT FUNNI! (and whoever posts first what I'm quoting here earns one vote from me)
    Derwin wrote: »
    buh-ludd!

    *Edit* Funny, Jake wont let me type in all caps haha!

    I have no idea what "buh-ludd!" is supposed to mean, but that's not it. I give you a hint: It has something to do with Nazis and a joke (and before anybody complains about Nazi jokes: I AM German)
  • Marzhin wrote: »
    Please be reassured, I did get your point the first time around. But I disagree with it. It's not because someone doesn't agree with you he necessarily didn't understand, you know :p

    However I think humor can't be compared to morality because every civilization shares a common ground to what is seen as right or wrong (giving to the poor is "good", stealing is "bad"...). Without those moral rules, civilization cannot exist. On the other hand, humour depends on education, historical background of the country, the person's life, and so on. When an american do a joke about lawyers, his fellow americans will find it funny (or not) but at least they will get it. A french or british or german, where the legal system works differently, will just rise an eyebrow.

    I'm not saying humour and morality are conceptually similar. The analogy is intended to illustrate that just because something is subjective doesn't mean that opinion is evenly spread about it. Even though there is a high level of disagreement about what is funny, there is also a good level of agreement. For example, more people find Monkey Island funny than Schindler's List.

    I understand that there is a wide level of cultural difference which informs the sense of humour (moreso than morality) but that doesn't change the basic fact that more people will find some lines funny than others; it isn't just completely random what people find funny. That's why in threads like 'What's your favourite line in Chapter 1?' there are lots of different lines suggested but SOME lines come up over and over again.
    Marzhin wrote: »
    But what you seem to overlook is the fact that only works if people can read all the entries *at once* (i.e. same chances for every entry).

    From the moment people have to do a bit of research to read more entries, those entries have no way to win (because, as marketing teach us, people are lazy, and on the internet they are lazier.)

    The basics of statistics is also to have the same conditions for everyone. In the current form of the contest, it is not the case.

    Actually, that shouldn't make TOO much of a difference. The way it is set up at the moment, on the left hand side of the screen a bunch of random entries appear, until you refresh them. Because which ones appear is random, all of the quotes get about the same amount of exposure - each of the 3000 lines has about the same chance of appearing. This is, statistically speaking, a fair way to ensure that each line has a decent chance to be voted for without having to make the visitor trawl through them all...

    So as far as browsing entries via the contest page goes it IS the same conditions for everyone (except for the top 5 which are always on display, which could skew things a little, but nowhere near as much as a resourceful guy with lots of places to spam his link)
  • So as far as browsing entries via the contest page goes it IS the same conditions for everyone (except for the top 5 which are always on display, which could skew things a little, but nowhere near as much as a resourceful guy with lots of places to spam his link)

    The only way to win popularity contest is through marketing and publicity. Why do you think the presidents of the US are always from the big parties that could afford to spend to promote their candidates in the media, and not from independent candidates or candidates from smaller parties?
  • Sure, its Viral Marketing to hype the game. I don´t spread the Link with my line around, nor do i hold up a big "Vote Me" sign for that matter. I contribute for the heck of it, never twittered in my life. If you vote for it, fine. If not, i´m not angry either.
  • smashing wrote: »
    The only way to win popularity contest is through marketing and publicity. Why do you think the presidents of the US are always from the big parties that could afford to spend to promote their candidates in the media, and not from independent candidates or candidates from smaller parties?

    Well yes, exactly. My whole post is me expressing doubts that a popularity contest is a good idea when the prize is for the line to appear in the game. In other words, run a popularity contest by all means but maybe the prize should be something which doesn't impact the final game.

    A similar thing could be said about the presidency, I guess, but at least they have to go through SOME due process to get elected.
  • A similar thing could be said about the presidency, I guess, but at least they have to go through SOME due process to get elected.

    Hahahahaah~! This really cracks me up.

    Anyway, just to rehash from my previous post, Telltale reserve the rights to determine the winner as stated in the rules. So there is really no point in continuing this argument.
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    viz
    I agree Surplus, plus in an election the only people eligible to vote are those whose interests are tied to the result of said election. You don't see people from Europe voting for who they would like to win the US Presidency and vice versa (unless they have been granted citizenship of that country).

    As I said in my previous post, I don't see how it could be easily resolved, although as was pointed out in the terms, Telltale do have the final say, which makes it a slightly more legit process given that they are still not going to go through them all, which is understandable.
  • viz wrote: »
    I agree Surplus, plus in an election the only people eligible to vote are those whose interests are tied to the result of said election. You don't see people from Europe voting for who they would like to win the US Presidency and vice versa (unless they have been granted citizenship of that country).

    Extremely good (and subtle (and relevant)) point.
  • There's an easy way to resolve this - draw the winner from the hat!

    If the rabbit appears, then everyone lose.
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