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What to do to Old Games You Can't Play Anymore

posted by Zeek on - last edited - Viewed by 1.3K users
I'm in a bit of a jam. I recently discovered that a lot of my older games I can no longer play for one reason or another. (Internal save batteries need to be replaced, DOS no longer exists and an emulator is needed, general console burn-out due to age, etc.)

Unfortunately, I can't sell these games as they are worthless on the open market. Maybe a few collectors would buy them, but I doubt I can get more than $15 for *shuffles through collection* Sewer Shark? Make that more than $5 for that title.

Anyway, what do you guys suggest I do with these games? The ones I'm emotionally attached to (LUNAR especially), I'm keeping as a display piece, but the rest? I just don't know what to do with them.
31 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • Do you have a list of the games you want to get rid of? You'd be surprised what someone might give for seemingly worthless games.
  • Replacing save batteries isn't that hard.
  • Rather Dashing;462248 said:
    Replacing save batteries isn't that hard.
    So I'm told, and I've watched my fair share of tutorials on how to do it. Now tell me how to fix my SNES which apparently can no longer properly read the game cartridge.:p

    ShaggE, I have yet to make an inventory of the games I'm willing to part with, but off the top of my head, I have Silpheed (Sega CD), Sonic 3D (Genesis), and I believe Caesar's Palace (SNES). I have several Playstation games that I'm holding on to just in case I can play them on a PS3. (At least, I hope I can play the LUNAR series on a PS3...)
  • This is unrelated, but one of my friends managed to mod his GBC to say "you're a nasty pasty in may!" with a picture of mario wearing sunglasses whenever it booted. How?!?
  • Topic hijacker!!
  • Anything on CD, Find an emulator and put the CD in your computer. That's how I played GTA2 on my computer, seeing that the PS1 version is the only one my parents will allow me to get.

    For dos games, DOSBOX is awesome.

    Console cartridges I can't help with.
  • Random and sort of related, but my Pokemon Silver Game still works and I think I might need to frame it or something because of that reason.
  • Zeek;462250 said:
    So I'm told, and I've watched my fair share of tutorials on how to do it. Now tell me how to fix my SNES which apparently can no longer properly read the game cartridge.:p
    While it's hard to say without directly investigating it or hearing a more detailed observation of symptoms, if the problem is "it won't read games" then my guess is that you need to adjust or replace the pin connector. It also is the part most likely to fail in cartridge-based consoles over a period as long as the SNES has been out, and as such it's one of the easiest parts to replace.
  • Remolay;462340 said:
    Anything on CD, Find an emulator and put the CD in your computer. That's how I played GTA2 on my computer, seeing that the PS1 version is the only one my parents will allow me to get.

    For dos games, DOSBOX is awesome.
    So PS1 games can't be played on PS3? I'm told the PS3 is somewhat backwards compatible, with the major flaw being it can't play PS2 games for one reason or another (hence why they are re-releasing ICO and Shadow of the Collosous in HD).

    I've tried DOSBOX in the past, but it actually caused some problems with some of my games. At first I thought it was similar to what happened with SCUMMvm where the CD-ROM would just stop working once the emulator loaded the game, but that wasn't the case when I C&P'd the entire CD onto the hard drive. I can't remember if I ever solved that problem or not. All I know is that I was never able to get past the intro of Freddy Farcus when I tried it.
    Rather Dashing;462343 said:
    While it's hard to say without directly investigating it or hearing a more detailed observation of symptoms, if the problem is "it won't read games" then my guess is that you need to adjust or replace the pin connector. It also is the part most likely to fail in cartridge-based consoles over a period as long as the SNES has been out, and as such it's one of the easiest parts to replace.
    It may be easy, but how costly is it? Replacing the internal batteries of a GBC game looks to only set me back a few bucks every 10 years since those games run on watch batteries. Given how old the SNES is, I doubt I would be able to find and replace whatever is broken very easily. Same goes for the Sega CDX I have, which is having signal lag between the controler and the games.
  • Zeek;462353 said:
    It may be easy, but how costly is it? Replacing the internal batteries of a GBC game looks to only set me back a few bucks every 10 years since those games run on watch batteries. Given how old the SNES is, I doubt I would be able to find and replace whatever is broken very easily. Same goes for the Sega CDX I have, which is having signal lag between the controler and the games.
    A SNES pin connector? $15-20 max.
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