Telltale Autumn Sale

Games too simple and too short

Bit dissapointed with these games so far.

No real interaction in the game.

It is just a story. The only playing involved is asking the right questions and using the right objection point.

Not worth the £1.99 I paid for it. I expected better from Telltale.

Comments

  • edited December 2011
    So it's closer to BttF and JP than it is to Sam and Max and Monkey Island, then?

    Thanks for the heads-up. I was actually considering getting this for a while. I hope Telltale returns to their senses soon.
  • edited December 2011
    No spoilers but is the story good?
  • edited December 2011
    coolsome wrote: »
    No spoilers but is the story good?

    Well I liked the stories so far but I think its hard to judge yet because there is apperantly some bigger story that will run trough all the episodes.

    So far they have borrowed from a couple of Law & Order episodes meaning if you watch the show regulary then you will not find much new here.
  • edited December 2011
    So it's closer to BttF and JP than it is to Sam and Max and Monkey Island, then?

    Thanks for the heads-up. I was actually considering getting this for a while. I hope Telltale returns to their senses soon.

    Play the game and you will find out. You find a body, you interview the witness then search the crime scene then interview a witness which leads to another witness to interview to another witness to eventually you arrest a murder suspect. No real interaction. You can't choose where to go it is already decided for you.

    The older Law and Order games were much better than this which is nothing more than a story.

    I purchased the first two episodes. Not sure if I will buy the rest.
  • edited December 2011
    So it's closer to BttF and JP than it is to Sam and Max and Monkey Island, then?

    Thanks for the heads-up. I was actually considering getting this for a while. I hope Telltale returns to their senses soon.

    At least in BttF there is puzzles to solve.
  • edited December 2011
    daro2096 wrote: »
    At least in BttF there is puzzles to solve.

    Is there? I don't remember solving any puzzles in BttF :p
  • edited December 2011
    Woodsyblue wrote: »
    Is there? I don't remember solving any puzzles in BttF :p

    You have to fix the subwoofer in episode 1. That is a puzzle is it not?
  • edited December 2011
    daro2096 wrote: »
    You have to fix the subwoofer in episode 1. That is a puzzle is it not?

    I was making a joke at the expense of BttF: TG's simplicity and poor design, as explained best by Rather Dashing.
  • edited December 2011
    All through Episode 1 I kept asking myself if this was a straight ripoff of an episode I'd already seen. Fact of the matter is that the plot components are an amalgam of aired episodes, and there's minimal new or engaging to continue to buy further episodes of this game. :p
    I'm stopping at #1, as I know Telltale can do better (Sam & Max and Monkey island were sooo cool!):winslow:
  • edited December 2011
    Comic Sans is a good way to gain respect, y'know. :P
  • edited December 2011
    beamerboy wrote: »
    All through Episode 1 I kept asking myself if this was a straight ripoff of an episode I'd already seen. Fact of the matter is that the plot components are an amalgam of aired episodes, and there's minimal new or engaging to continue to buy further episodes of this game. :p
    I'm stopping at #1, as I know Telltale can do better (Sam & Max and Monkey island were sooo cool!):winslow:

    Well thats disappointing.
  • edited December 2011
    Wow. This does not give me high hopes of telltale's future.(Please don't wreck the Walking Dead Telltale).
  • edited December 2011
    I hope telltale is not going the hidden object route in future games.
  • edited January 2012
    It's sad it's not close to CSI. Not gonna buy this, hoping for puzzle solving adventure games :)
  • edited January 2012
    jannar85 wrote: »
    It's sad it's not close to CSI. Not gonna buy this, hoping for puzzle solving adventure games :)

    I dunno. Stepping back and realizing that it's a Law & Order game, how would puzzle solving elements make sense? Just thinking about some of the puzzles in Tales of Monkey Island or Sam & Max, they would be completely out of place in a game about Law & Order. I mean, what would you have them put in the game? A never ending section of city intersections that detectives in modern New York City can't navigate through until they find a secret map that tells them which directions to go in to advance? No thanks, that would just be silly.
    Woodsyblue wrote: »
    I was making a joke at the expense of BttF: TG's simplicity and poor design, as explained best by Rather Dashing.

    People actually read that wall of crap? I couldn't get any farther than this gem:
    The genius puzzle here is, of course, Use Tire Iron with Tire, which certainly requires thinking "outside of the box".
    Oh dear, how dare a solution to a puzzle be straight forward? Logic and common sense are not allowed in point and click adventure games. Everything must be so off the wall and nonsensical that you spend hours rubbing everything in your inventory with every possible point of interaction until something works, because there's absolutely no way to apply any kind of rational logic to it. If every single puzzle in every game was as completely nonsensical as stopping Whizzer's Cider of Knowledge plan in episode 5 of Sam & Max Beyond Time and Space*, they wouldn't be any fun to play. It'd just be a bunch of frustrating rounds of clicking everything over and over until someone figured it out and wrote a guide so everyone else could get through.

    Honestly, if that's the kind of extremely pointless nitpicking that guy wants to bring to the table, I'm not even going to be bothered to read the rest and I'm probably not going to be too bothered to concern myself with the thoughts of anyone who takes that rant seriously.

    *
    You want to stop Whizzer from getting people to repeat the original sin of eating the fruit from the tree of knowledge. Stopping him requires taking a bottle of his cider made from that fruit and pouring it in a cooler so people drink it, thus making all those people repeat the original sin, even though you're meant to stop people from drinking it. How in the hell does that make ANY sense?!
  • edited January 2012
    mjc0961 wrote: »
    People actually read that wall of crap? I couldn't get any farther than this gem:

    Oh dear, how dare a solution to a puzzle be straight forward? Logic and common sense are not allowed in point and click adventure games. Everything must be so off the wall and nonsensical that you spend hours rubbing everything in your inventory with every possible point of interaction until something works, because there's absolutely no way to apply any kind of rational logic to it. If every single puzzle in every game was as completely nonsensical as stopping Whizzer's Cider of Knowledge plan in episode 5 of Sam & Max Beyond Time and Space*, they wouldn't be any fun to play. It'd just be a bunch of frustrating rounds of clicking everything over and over until someone figured it out and wrote a guide so everyone else could get through.

    Honestly, if that's the kind of extremely pointless nitpicking that guy wants to bring to the table, I'm not even going to be bothered to read the rest and I'm probably not going to be too bothered to concern myself with the thoughts of anyone who takes that rant seriously.

    *
    You want to stop Whizzer from getting people to repeat the original sin of eating the fruit from the tree of knowledge. Stopping him requires taking a bottle of his cider made from that fruit and pouring it in a cooler so people drink it, thus making all those people repeat the original sin, even though you're meant to stop people from drinking it. How in the hell does that make ANY sense?!

    I think you're defending your point without standing on a basis of argument. Everything you say in this post makes me inclined that you don't know how to play an "adventure" game, which isn't all that bad, and you don't know how to empathize with an adventure gamer, which isn't also really all that bad. What's bad is you're in heated controversy, implying what you say is true.

    I like my game to challenge my mind. I don't know how you play your games but I don't check walkthroughs. I do get stuck, many often in fact, but the part of the fun is to solve the issue after looking at the issue in every angle imaginable. Compared to that, if your adventure game's highlight puzzle is about USE TIRE IRON WITH TIRE, I don't think even you can defend this. As an adventure game, BttF lacks certain aromas -which all are what experienced adventure gamers crave for. As a game that tells me a story, I also didn't like the story, but it's irrelevant as of now. Point is, your argument heavily relies on "Oh so you like adventure games like this, BUT WHY IS IT LIKE THAT ANYWAY? Huh? You're WRONG". I have no problems with people liking BttF. But it's certainly problematic that people like you completely blindfolds theirselves to the shoutings of a certain minority, desperately trying to defend that such problems do not EXIST, and doing all those with the misusage of words such as "nitpicking", "crap" and sarcastic blabbery.

    If you've read that post a little more you could see that Dashing comments on EVERY MINOR OR MAJOR DETAIL THAT CAUGHT HIS EYE during his playthrough of the said episode, meaning, I don't think he left out a single element of the episode the episode wanted to "give" you, and he didn't simply like them as well. I think it contradicts heavily with the definition of nitpicking.
  • VainamoinenVainamoinen Moderator
    edited January 2012
    I wish the PC/Mac version of L&O was out soon, because right now I think a couple of guys are just going back and forth about a game they have never even played.


    Dashing's BTTF analysis (which I approve) is of course a lampoon. Visible disappointment with the game puts certain things more into focus than others, which doesn't necessarily make the critique less valid. Such massive effort to analyse every detail necessarily results in "nitpicking". Of course it does. I feel that this is quite all right though because neither is the big picture neglected, nor can a good adventure game afford to disregard said details. But this is not the place to talk about BTTF yet again.

    What we have here are the clashing critiques of two extremes - uninspired, entirely "easy" puzzles on the one hand and illogical "hard" puzzles on the other. I can say with some certainty that most people on these forums would wish for game designers to find a balance between the two, to keep the feeling of a challenge high while avoiding frustration. And who knows, you might even both belong to that group.

    "Adventure" is already one of the least defined genres in video game culture. And from the look of things, applying the "adventure" puzzle paradigm to L&O might be a bit more difficult here than it was in BTTF.

    From reports up to now, I have classified L&O:L as less of a "puzzle solving" experience and more of a "choose your own adventure" design. Cases act out differently according to your choices, results will explicitly vary. Seems like a valid and interesting concept to me, so I'd give it a try and reserve judgement for later.
  • edited January 2012
    mjc0961 wrote: »
    People actually read that wall of crap?

    Honestly, if that's the kind of extremely pointless nitpicking that guy wants to bring to the table, I'm not even going to be bothered to read the rest and I'm probably not going to be too bothered to concern myself with the thoughts of anyone who takes that rant seriously.

    I'm not going to start another BttF debate in the L&O forums. If you want to argue against what Dashing said then it would be best to do it in his thread.
  • edited January 2012
    I don't really think of Telltale's stuff as "video games" so much as "seminonlinear interactive animated movies," & I love that about them.
  • edited January 2012
    Well, I must say, I was disappointed in JP. Why? It played like a movie.
    But it's a good thing too, but I miss the interaction, the puzzles and stuff. Even though it's tense, it could have been better in many ways. I don't really like the direction TT is heading, I know TT opens up for a broader audience, but we adventure gamers that has been here from the beginning still is waiting for the next puzzle-solving game.

    I mean, TT was the new LucasArts. Then they rocked like kings when they got S&M and MI. I just hope with TWD they can show us that they still are here :) Maybe even make two different approaches. One option with puzzles and one without. Like MI2 (easy and hard).

    If they are stopping developing real adventure games, I hope they tell me soon, so I won't have to be disappoined by their next releases :)

    If they only were developing the Monkey Island movie..... with puzzles :P
  • edited January 2012
    L&O isn't like any of Telltale's other games. The best way to describe it is to say that it's a serious Phonenix Wright. You find clues, interrogate suspects, and then take it to the courtroom.

    Why would you need inventory puzzles or sidequests?

    I enjoyed the first episode, and I've only seen a scattering of L&O with my aunt. Granted, I like murder mysteries. A lot.

    My main complaint is the aesthetic. I have nothing wrong with cell shading, but being legally blind, I enjoy video games because every character is both unique and easily recognizable. I know L&O went for realism, but there's so much grey I can't tell some of the characters apart.
  • edited January 2012
    L&O isn't like any of Telltale's other games. The best way to describe it is to say that it's a serious Phonenix Wright. You find clues, interrogate suspects, and then take it to the courtroom.

    Why would you need inventory puzzles or sidequests?

    I enjoyed the first episode, and I've only seen a scattering of L&O with my aunt. Granted, I like murder mysteries. A lot.

    My main complaint is the aesthetic. I have nothing wrong with cell shading, but being legally blind, I enjoy video games because every character is both unique and easily recognizable. I know L&O went for realism, but there's so much grey I can't tell some of the characters apart.
    To be more clear, it's an easier version of the Phoenix Wright games, or the old L and O games. Not that's a bad thing.

    And the thing is, the graphics look fine, after taking a look at it... but it just doesn't fit with L and O. It feels to anime-ish. It's something you would see with Sam and Max, not with L and O.
  • edited January 2012
    It's a relatively short and easy game, easier than the CSI games considering that the hunt for clues is almost like hidden object games where you know exactly what you are looking for (and how many). The upside is that the game actually reminds and allows you to replay the previous stage in case you didn't get every point, except the plea deal decision which is a little annoying if intentional, since you have to restart the entire episode just to try the alternative branches.

    I am playing the PC version so that's based on the first three episodes (which I have gone through rather thoroughly, even reaching >58 for episode 3) that are available so far. The price is okay for the content, but I would have much preferred something more elaborate like CSI or PW.
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