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    Blind Sniper Moderator

    That sounds pretty interesting. I've heard stories of people using the game for academic research as well. It's cool to see what impact this game has had.

    • My AP physics teacher uses Kerbal space program to teach delta V (mathematical, and true), Isp, air resistance, friction, TWR, and many more. Then once a month we spend 2 hours having a competition to see who can go the furthest and safely land back on kerbal, and bonus points if you land on the surface of a celestial body and then take off again. But you have to show your math which is a pain :/

  • Now I want to live in Norway...

    All joking aside, this just proves to people that video games can be used for a higher purpose rather than just entertainment. Portal 1 and 2 are used in school as well, and to see a game like The Walking Dead being taught in a class room is quite inspiring to say the least.

  • Man, we live in an exciting time. We get to see a medium that's still in its infancy slowly being embraced on a social level, and transcending its own conventions to be relevant academically as well.

    We're on the ground level of media's final frontier... Interactive entertainment. And as this thread shows, few are pushing the boundaries more than Telltale!

    Here's hoping that the gamification of school continues. I've always been a firm believer in games as a teaching tool since the Jump Start games improved my math skills as a kid.

    • Not to mention language skills! I probably wouldn't even feel confident writing this comment if I hadn't started learning english from games at a young age.

      • I know right. Learned English and Japanese through various untranslated/imported games and Visual Novels and it's thanks to those that I even have my current job. Interactive entertainment is the future, not the current "beat it into your head until you feel like puking" method. I'm pretty sure that if the people responsible for our Education spent more time thinking "How could we make this lesson less boring for the students ?" instead of "I'll just throw that nugget, do a few practice exercises then call it a day, I wonder what's for dinner tonight ?" then there'd be much better results worldwide.

        I'm not saying teachers should be GTO-like (how cool would that be though...) but there could definitely be an improvement on that part.

        During one of our class travels we've been in a school where students all have laptops during lessons, they could take a break and do a few mini-games (5 minutes locked timers on games for a 1h lesson) and could chat freely between each other.

        Guess what, this school's success rate in national exams is over 97%...

  • Well I think we know what school to attend now

  • if it wasn't for rpgs I can honestly say I would probably be illiterate as I cant stand to read a book. I try but some books go way into the smallest detail when a visual aid can paint a 1000 words in a second while I have to spend 2 pages reading what so and so's house looks and smells like which when described I could care less but if I see it gets the point over in a second while I can focus on other things at the same time.... video games should have been implicated in schools a long time ago, who knows maybe I wouldn't have spent my last 2 years of high school tired of giving a fuck seeing as I was always an A student till then. Read the great Gatsby? bitch read between my fingers >:O

    • When reading books, your brain will be the most active, compared to doing other things (watching tv, playing games)

      • yeah maybe, but not when it doesn't catch your interest and you're just reading it cause you have to and are constantly asking yourself "Omg when is this boring piece of shit book going to be over" Honestly if I have a movie on my dvr I end up skipping about a fourth of it cause I get tired of the blah blah blah bullcrap who cares moments" There's a few books that catch my interest but when its unnecessarily long just for the point of being a long book then I lose interest. I like when people get strait to the point, so I guess that has something to do with why I don't enjoy reading most of the time. Articles are better to read, they inform you on the world without focusing so much detail on a fictional character I couldn't care less about.

  • It's an interesting take on the entire concept. First of all, its of course cool they use a game as an education tool, but I don't think it should or could be limited to ethics/TWD. I think some kind of education class used Sim City as a model for how societies grow and Minecraft cold be used in pretty much any creative class and so on, its just a question of how open for new ideas teachers and schools are.

  • I know one thing. If I ever have a child I won't let them anywhere near those god awful kids games aimed at teaching some bullshit, you know those games for 5 year olds. Those things do nothing but bring misery to all those that happen upon them.

    I like that with so many different stories told in games a parent who has played that game gets an opportunity to listen to what their child thinks about parts of it.

  • I can't wait to see how this works out,. It's a very interesting social experiment and I hope it brings good results. I wonder if the students will like it, for instance, given that the game was imposed by the school. Personally, I've gotten to hate a few very good book just 'cause I had to overanalise every single fricking line. I really hope this is not the case.

  • Waint do all students play the game or watch someone play it? School computers here in norway are pretty shit and all college kids buys a mac.

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