Telltale Autumn Sale

I would say Season 1's choices is far more better than Season 2.

I am sure I am going to get downvotes... ok let's cut to the chase. It's not what I am going to say that Season 2 sucks or Season 1 is way too good. First, Let's just analyse the choices:

  1. First, let's take a good look on S1E1 choices, we had to choose either to save Doug or Carley, there are good reasons to save them both but unfortunately only one will live and one will die. One hell of a tough choice, but still, I like it.

  2. There's a choice when either you have to kill the dog or leave him in All That Remains, most of the players kill the dog to end his suffering. I getting for downvote.. -.- This choice isn't very nice, I mean, how can I say this is a touch choice?

  3. Saving Ben or not, this one is good also! Choosing to sit with Luke or Kenny is also a tough choice. Both seasons' storyline are nice, but choices..
    Season 2 disappointed not exactly.

I don't give a fuck even if I get millions of downvotes, just sharing my opinion, I don't think Season 2 has a lot of tough choices.

«1

Comments

  • I really like season 2 but i know what you mean.
    The only choice that hit me hard was deciding which table to sit at :'D

  • Also in season one your choices had a bigger effect. Remember Lee can help smash Larry's head in or he can try to save him, thus leading to Kenny or Lily not having your back depending on your choice. In season 2 that was a hard choice for which table to sit at, but the characters don't seem to remember your choices as much as they did in season 1.

  • Guys, lets just face facts. Sean Vanaman leaving took a big toll on Telltale.

  • Far more better: when something is so much better, that "far better" is just not enough.

  • edited June 2014

    Nick or Pete was a hard choice too, but i see what you mean. I hope cutting or leaving Sarita's arm choice doesn't end in a ''She dies either way'' scenario.

  • I agree with most of this, but can't we just wait til' the season is over to judge it? Still 2-3 hours of gameplay left.

  • edited June 2014

    We will judge it as a whole at the end, but I see no reason to withhold judgement until then. They claim that the episodic nature of their games allows them to respond to feedback. If we only sing praises for what we consider a flawed season, or simply not say anything at all, what good will that make the game?

    _Juice_Box_ posted: »

    I agree with most of this, but can't we just wait til' the season is over to judge it? Still 2-3 hours of gameplay left.

  • Yeah. I understand that feeling. Maybe next episodes will have tougher choices? Because, you know, Sarah and all that situation. We'll see.

  • edited June 2014

    You mean that the choices affect more at season 1 than season 2, right? Because Doug or Carley wasn´t really a tough choice: While Doug is a cool, stable, tech-expert person, Carley is skilled with firearms, saved Duck´s and Lee´s lives( or Clementine´s, if you didn´t defended her from the walker from the bathroom ), kept the game open about knowing your dark past, not judging you by it neither holding it to use against you( unlike Larry ), and lastly, well... she is a pretty lady. Saved Carley was 70% to 80% the last time i saw. However it created pretty different branches for episode 2 and for the start of the episode 3. The choices of season 2 doesn´t seem to have these long-term effects... most of the tough choices of S2E3, like trusting Bonnie or admitting stealing the walkie-talkie( S2E2´s choice about telling Walter the truth is a good example too), didn´t matter at all... didn´t even have short-term effects and i doubt they will come up later at episode 4 or 5.

  • I'm afraid this is true.

    lucid121 posted: »

    Guys, lets just face facts. Sean Vanaman leaving took a big toll on Telltale.

  • Exactly.

    We will judge it as a whole at the end, but I see no reason to withhold judgement until then. They claim that the episodic nature

  • edited June 2014

    What Telltale could do is make choices that are equally difficult or more affecting to the game's story. Killing or leaving the dog... Choosing to confront Walter about Matthew... Watching Carver get beaten or not... These choices aren't that difficult or important to the story.

    If it was Season 1, the first choice would've been like, meeting the dog and choosing whether to keep him with you or leave him behind, which both can have repercussions and add dynamics to the story. The next choice would've been Walter and Nick fighting and Clem having the choice who to defend, which ultimately kills one of them by accident, or choose to stop the fight. And lastly, the third choice would've been to either tie Carver up, let Clem kill him, or let Kenny kill him. And depending on how evil your Clem is, you can secretly give Carver something sharp to cut himself free before leaving, if you chose to tie him up, adding new dynamics to the story.

  • You guys still don't get it why they're playing loose and fragile with characters and choices in Season 2, Do you?

  • Enlighten me.

    Leo8Skylar posted: »

    You guys still don't get it why they're playing loose and fragile with characters and choices in Season 2, Do you?

  • edited June 2014

    You're not Lee anymore, You can't control your own fate and how you drift in the Apocalypse world, Season 2 is all about that. Episode 5 is most probably going to give a choice of Survivalists vs Community to give you a clean start of controlling your own fate as Clementine. The Walking dead has always been about Clementine.

    Nonatastic posted: »

    Enlighten me.

  • And Jake, everyone forgets Jake. :(

    lucid121 posted: »

    Guys, lets just face facts. Sean Vanaman leaving took a big toll on Telltale.

  • edited June 2014

    Wow. Now I stopped to think. Take the situation with Larry and put Clementine instead. Maybe you're right.

    Leo8Skylar posted: »

    You're not Lee anymore, You can't control your own fate and how you drift in the Apocalypse world, Season 2 is all about that. Epi

  • Season 1 of TWD was more character driven than season 2 is. Season two is more action focused and doesn't rely of sentimentality and interpersonal relationships as much. So the selections we get are reflected in that. I guess it up to the preference of the player to see what type of decision type they prefer.

  • Thanks. Season 2 has minor problems. The fans have a habit of being too sensitive about changing and evolving on the storyline aspect.

    Morloki posted: »

    Wow. Now I stopped to think. Take the situation with Larry and put Clementine instead. Maybe you're right.

  • edited June 2014

    It has to do with the plot and the overall writing. In Season 1, there was a focus on survival and getting Clementine to her parents with a lot of tough choices & drama associated with it. Now in Season 2, the plot is downplayed and is more focused on drama than survival or meaningful decision making.

    Leo8Skylar posted: »

    You guys still don't get it why they're playing loose and fragile with characters and choices in Season 2, Do you?

  • edited June 2014

    False. You're not paying much attention. Focusing on superficial elements.

    It has to do with the plot and the overall writing. In Season 1, there was a focus on survival and getting Clementine to her paren

  • edited June 2014

    I'm just saying it as it is, there's no need to disagree and judge how I pay attention. Telltale has got a different vision of what they want now and it's more unappealing than Season 1. If it's meant to be more realistic from an 11 year old's standpoint, then I understand, but that shouldn't undermine what qualities made Season 1 great.

    Leo8Skylar posted: »

    False. You're not paying much attention. Focusing on superficial elements.

  • edited June 2014

    Season 2 is a continuity to Season 1. They progressed it pretty damn well, And i can see this progress and Season 2 is actually better than Season 1. Not a matter of quality, It's a matter of atmosphere. Meaning that they got deeper within The Walking Dead atmosphere rather than portraying a fallen world to the ZA. I don't understand why most of the fans don't see it.

    I'm just saying it as it is, there's no need to disagree and judge how I pay attention. Telltale has got a different vision of wha

  • There's absolutely nothing wrong with Season 2 or it's atmosphere. It's just that some of us would like choices to have more of an impact to everything like Season 1. That's all...

    Leo8Skylar posted: »

    Season 2 is a continuity to Season 1. They progressed it pretty damn well, And i can see this progress and Season 2 is actually be

  • As i explained before, it's only a setting to get Clementine to truly create her own fate by 205.

    There's absolutely nothing wrong with Season 2 or it's atmosphere. It's just that some of us would like choices to have more of an impact to everything like Season 1. That's all...

  • Oh, I see. Episode 5 is going to be brutal...

    Leo8Skylar posted: »

    As i explained before, it's only a setting to get Clementine to truly create her own fate by 205.

  • I hope so, Or else I will be very disappointed.

    Oh, I see. Episode 5 is going to be brutal...

  • Still 2-3 hours of gameplay left.

    Jesus christ that's how long episode 4 of season 1 was....

    _Juice_Box_ posted: »

    I agree with most of this, but can't we just wait til' the season is over to judge it? Still 2-3 hours of gameplay left.

  • Yep, and I honestly didn't like that it was so long.

    Still 2-3 hours of gameplay left. Jesus christ that's how long episode 4 of season 1 was....

  • I think some choices in Season 2 choices are a lot harder in Season 1's...

    With who did you have dinner with? even though the majority sat with Kenny...

    Surrender or look for Kenny? Majority with Kenny...again.

    Watch a man getting his skull smashed in = getting a lil' girl be cold-hearted or walk away protecting your innocence? This one was a tough for me...

    and maybe more!

    I don't know if this 2nd Season is a filler one...just to screw up Clementine's young mind...we shall see.

  • edited June 2014

    I still fail to see why we should be happy that a game which emphasizes group dynamics, choice and consequence (or at least the illusion of those) lacks said elements.

    Leo8Skylar posted: »

    You guys still don't get it why they're playing loose and fragile with characters and choices in Season 2, Do you?

  • I don't think it's that the choices are "better" per say. The ones in season 1 just had more weight to the story, and changed the story more. Some choices I feel have been really pointless though, like the telling Bonnie about the walkie talkie choice I felt was rather weak as a choice. It would've been a much better choice in the category of trust if we had the option of either letting Bonnie come with us or not, since telling her about a walkie talkie is one thing (I'm still surprised most people told her), but letting her come with your group is another.

    Some choices this season have been good though like who to sit with for dinner choice (although it was very likely more people would favour Kenny), and the lose-lose situation with Sarita.

  • Because it'll all matter in the ending of a >90 minute episode.

    Right guys?

    I still fail to see why we should be happy that a game which emphasizes group dynamics, choice and consequence (or at least the illusion of those) lacks said elements.

  • If you see it from that way, Then you're right. But there's a huge difference between fiction for entertainment, And thematic fiction. That's the transformation that happened to the walking dead from Season 1 to Season 2. Thematic fiction needs someone who's paying much attention to the game, Automatically analyzing every aspect of it.

    It's not about being happy about it, It's about explaining why are things in this such way. If you keep seeing it from the superficial version of that choices aren't difficult, ... Etc, You won't see its beauty.

    I still fail to see why we should be happy that a game which emphasizes group dynamics, choice and consequence (or at least the illusion of those) lacks said elements.

  • ...I wish a guy I know was here to counter that, I'm at a loss of words.

    What must that elite of fiction fans see in Season Two?

    Leo8Skylar posted: »

    If you see it from that way, Then you're right. But there's a huge difference between fiction for entertainment, And thematic fict

  • Decent atmosphere, And a strong protagonist. Also, Reasonable progress of the protagonist. That's where the complains begin, Less characters development and so on. But if you see it for the Dev's point, You won't see any problem about that, they're just portraying ideas right now to give Clementine a choice to start creating her own identity. If you focus on the big picture, There're only minor problems, Like the lack of a decent and new gameplay. They have stated that they want to do something new and different rather than doing puzzles, So why not using 201's stealth as much? It was used in 203 a bit, But doesn't have the same feeling as 201.

    ...I wish a guy I know was here to counter that, I'm at a loss of words. What must that elite of fiction fans see in Season Two?

  • A choice that should of mattered from 400 Days was the choice of telling Leland the truth or lying to him. If Bonnie lied, she would become a liar and then if Clementine told Bonnie about Luke in Ep3 then Bonnie would of not kept her promise and tell Carver about Luke. And if she told the truth to Leland then she would keep the secret from Carver.

  • they can do whatever they are doing to collab with that zen studio but not with those guys that left and created their own company. I mean I have to ask again why did those guys leave??? any game they are making??? more money why???

    lucid121 posted: »

    Guys, lets just face facts. Sean Vanaman leaving took a big toll on Telltale.

  • edited June 2014

    As a game design major myself, it's ttg's responsibility to manage both. If you make the worlds best thematic story but forget gameplay and the player, it should have been a movie. The unique thing about games as art is the interactivity and immersion... and if a creative decision like Clem being ineffectual and distant does not come through in the tone or feel of a game, then quite simply they did it poorly. It is not that the majority of fans are not good enough to understand Telltale's work... it is the responsibility of the storyteller to convey the story to the listener/reader/viewer/player. It says less about TTG's developing skills than simply not making a better game than S1 to say that they have all these things in mind and simply could not execute on conveying it...

    Past that, your theory would hold more weight if it honestly felt like Clem got less of a say in the group - it is not so. Clem still gets to decide a whole lot for the group, is given every important task, is expected to take care of other characters (take care of Nick, Sarah, Alvin, Rebecca's child, etc), and is included in every major decision the group makes. The thing that's MISSING is people reacting to Clem as a person, developing a relationship with her, starting friendships and rivalries over the choices that she DOES make. If it were true that they were trying to make you feel like a child, it would be reversed - people would develop opinions of you and react to you, but not involve you in the important things.

    I am very happy for you that you are enjoying some of the thematic elements and decisions in TWD S2. I assure you, I see them all as well. I would disagree that they were not there in S1, and I would disagree that S2 is particularly strong thematically in my opinion. But as a game, it is not doing its JOB to make us feel helpless and young. You want to feel like a young child in a horror game? Play Fatal Frame 2. Do you want to feel "Your choices don't matter for a REASON" done right? Valkyrie Profile, SMT Nocturne, Spec Ops The Line, etc. There are many many many games out there that have tackled helplessness, directionlessness, being at the mercy of powers greater than yourself, and instead of segregating the themes from the gameplay and sacrificing a fulfilling and satisfying experience for the sake of the writing, the developers used the gameplay to make the entire experience resonate and make you FEEL what the writing is trying to say instead of showing or telling it.

    Gameplay is the only thing that can bridge the gap between a character being a person you like and a person being your /friend/, or a protagonist being the main character and sympathetic and the character feeling like YOU at the end. If they don't keep that end up, the whole ship sinks and it might as well have been a miniseries. Just my opinion.

    Leo8Skylar posted: »

    If you see it from that way, Then you're right. But there's a huge difference between fiction for entertainment, And thematic fict

  • Also, I don't think I'm some kind of an elite gamer or something, I just have an opinion, by that opinion respects and deeply analyzes the dev team's "Artistic Integrity".

    Speaking of which, I thought Mass Effect 3 had the same problem as TWDG season 2, But this time I was wrong, Weak atmosphere, Pointless and full of plot-holes plot-twist that doesn't need to exist, Shitty last mission of heavy head-cannoning, ... Etc.

    ...I wish a guy I know was here to counter that, I'm at a loss of words. What must that elite of fiction fans see in Season Two?

Sign in to comment in this discussion.