If Telltale Games Were 100% Honest With Us...

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  • The largest complaint is them using different already established IPs? Really?

  • I thought it would be complaining about the whole 'choices don't matter' thing.

  • edited November 2015

    "Send assassination squad to that address!" - Mook 1 ;)

    "Why?" - Mook 2

    "The truth has leaked out, the truth has leaked out!" - Mook 1

    "Also channel known as Gaming WIldlife and its content never existed." - Mook 2

    "Do I make myself clear?" - Mook 2

    "Yes, sir." - Mook 1

  • It's funny, because they used intellectual property as a successful model for expanding upon successful franchises and creating a vigorous tranmedia platforms while simultaneously reinvorgating the adventure genre by enabling a bunch of similar franchises inspired by Telltale to allow small to media budget developers to distribute their product without overreliance on AAA publishing companies. Gee, they really fucked up this one huh?

  • Yeah, many great episodic titles are being made by others companies thanks to Telltale Games making the market viable (or showing that it's viable market.)

    KIng's Quest (episodic title)
    Life is Strange

    Heck there is even something like noir one.

    Sarangholic posted: »

    It's funny, because they used intellectual property as a successful model for expanding upon successful franchises and creating a

  • The first complaint he raises is that TellTale games are glorified fan fictions. That's actually a complaint, or a bad thing?

  • TDMshadowCPTDMshadowCP Banned
    edited December 2015

    Thread: If Telltale Games Were 100% Honest With Us...


    enter link description here

    What do you guys think?

    Sorry if this has already been posted, haven't kept up with the forums lately.

  • It's been posted :P

  • edited December 2015

    Yuck.

    Edit: I literally watched it up to 1:10 and couldn't bear to listen to that bullshit any longer.

  • JenniferJennifer Moderator
    edited December 2015

    The fact that they actually work with the original creator of the game negates any claims of fan fiction (ie: Robert Kirkman on The Walking Dead, Bill Willingham and Vertigo on The Wolf Among Us, George R.R. Martin's personal assistant (and Mr. Martin himself chose Telltale as the company to make the game) and HBO for Game of Thrones, Steve Purcell on Sam & Max, Ron Gilbert and Dave Grossman (who actually co-designed the first two Monkey Island games and worked at Telltale from their foundation up to The Wolf Among Us) on Tales of Monkey Island, Mojang on Minecraft: Story Mode, Gearbox on Tales from the Borderlands, etc).

    You can hardly call it fan fiction when the creators of the property are directly involved in the creation of the game.

    The first complaint he raises is that TellTale games are glorified fan fictions. That's actually a complaint, or a bad thing?

  • They're still pretty much spin-offs either way, but I wasn't complaining about that. I was wondering why it's such a big deal to him. I don't understand why making new content in established universes is supposedly such a bad thing.

    Jennifer posted: »

    The fact that they actually work with the original creator of the game negates any claims of fan fiction (ie: Robert Kirkman on Th

  • I can't stand the video, at all.

  • Same, and it's not even because he's talking bad on Telltale. His reasoning is just stupid, who gives a fuck if they create their own IP's or not?

    AgentZ46 posted: »

    Yuck. Edit: I literally watched it up to 1:10 and couldn't bear to listen to that bullshit any longer.

  • edited December 2015

    Fan Fiction? All the games they have created are canon to their respective franchises, as there was some involvement with the owners of the respective franchises.

    They create their original stories, the stories they created never existed in the franchise before they were made, as for gameplay, it's a point & click choose your own adventure game, of course it's not going to have much gameplay, it's primary focus is on story, plot and character development, and in that case, why would they make it difficult to progress through the game? It's not exactly a game that would benefit much from difficulty.

    So what if all the games they've made were based off already existing franchises? Why is that a bad thing? As for bringing up low sales of some of their past games, it was their past games, the company itself wasn't as well known until The Walking Dead Game, I never saw any of their games in the retails I've been to until TWDG came out on disc which got Game of the Year despite it's lack in gameplay.

    Of course, a Diabetes joke is thrown in after comparing a game to food.

    I'm not sure what he means by glitchy games, I've encountered very few glitches playing TTG games(Game of Thrones was very glitchy for me however), that would be a subjective experience since not everyone experiences those glitches.

    "A story someone else told" I don't recall these stories ever being told until TTG released the episodes with those stories. What's the point of this video again? Cause it certainly doesn't provide any constructive criticism, smells more like plain hate towards the company to me. He's really just trying to say that they don't make their own original stories, but they do, they've also made their own franchises as well. I personally think it's smart of TTG to seek big titles for their games, it makes them more money and fame and it gets me more entertainment, I think what should matter more is the quality of their stories, not the originality because if you want to play that card, you have to remember that not everything is original today, allot of it has already been done before, just look at the comparisons between the DC and Marvel Comics. -soz for the rant :x

  • DeltinoDeltino Moderator
    edited December 2015

    I feel the biggest mistake anyone makes regarding Telltale is treating them like any old video game developer, and more importantly, judging them like any other video game developer

    Their games meet the basic definition for video game, yes, but judging their games by the same standards and metrics that we do practically every other game currently on the market is a lot more difficult

    Judging them by the same values you would any other current game developer is neither fair nor very accurate, neither to you or them

    They're something of an exception to the rule. The way I see it, you simply can't judge them the same way you'd judge any current commercial game

    Maybe for an apt comparison, let's think about an art contest. You have two entries, but both are completely different mediums. For example's sake, let's say a painting and a sculpture. Both of them are cut from the same cloth at the end of the day, but we don't judge them in the same way as one another. You look at a sculpture in a much different way than a painting. You judge a sculpture in a much different way than a painting. You weigh the intrinsic value of a sculpture in a much different way than a painting.

    I mean, you can't judge a sculpture for how defined the brush strokes are, or how well it captures light tones, or how well the use of the cool colors complement the warmer colors, or how well composed and defined the shadows are, or how well the artist captured the tone and image of a rainy night atop a bridge, flanked by the shimmering river flowing underneath it, and backed by the glowing, busy and bustling lights of the nearby city scape, and yadda yadda yadda, you get the point. Why? Because it's a goddamn sculpture.

    Or in the realm of literature; you can't judge a short poem the same way you do a full-fledged novel/book. Can you judge a poem by Emily Dickinson the same way you would judge, I don't know, a book from Isaac Asimov? No, not really. Because it just doesn't work that way.

    Can you judge an autobiography like a work of fiction? Can you judge War of the Worlds by the same standards as an autobiography of Charles Dickens' life? Hell no you can't. Unless you want to make a complaint about how you were disappointed that Charles Dickens never vaporized an entire city block (okay, this one's going too far, but you get the point by now)

    As for the argument regarding IPs, I think everyone else has driven home that point already, so yeah.

  • JenniferJennifer Moderator
    edited December 2015

    Telltale's games aren't always considered spin-offs. They are when the gameplay is completely different to the original game (as in the case of Tales from the Borderlands of Minecraft: Story mode), or if it's based on a movie or television series (such as Back to the Future: The Game or Game of Thrones), or a comic (such as The Walking Dead or The Wolf Among Us). But, if it's a game series that uses the same gameplay, Telltale's games are considered part of the main series (such as Sam & Max or Tales of Monkey Island).

    Using licensed intellectual properties is not a bad thing when it comes to the games themselves. But, as far as the business end goes, there are a few downsides.

    It can sometimes make it so a sequel can't happen, as they aren't free to do another game in that universe without renegotiating the contract. For instance, Telltale wanted to make a sequel to Tales from Monkey Island, as it was their biggest selling single game before Back to the Future: The Game, but LucasArts had a new president by that time and they weren't interested in licensing out the LucasArts adventure game properties. They've also said that whether Telltale will make a sequel to The Wolf Among Us is up to Bill Willingham.

    On rare occasions, it can even mean that already announced games wouldn't be released due to losing the contract. Telltale lost the rights to Bone before they could start work on the third game, which was already announced by the time of cancellation. This was before they got a hang for episodic releases with the release of Sam & Max, so the Bone episodes were released years apart. Warner Bros. got the rights to Bone in the meantime, and Telltale couldn't continue their Bone series (Telltale was still tiny at that time, as they only had a couple dozen employees at most, so there's no way they could negotiate a deal with Warner Bros. at that point in their history). And, of course, Activision took back the King's Quest license after it expired due to Telltale postponing all of their games after the delay of Jurassic Park: The Game. We can only guess what Telltale's King's Quest would have looked like (although The Odd Gentlemen are doing a great job of combining Telltale style choices and consequences with adventure game puzzles in their King's Quest series).

    As far as games that have already been released, the fact that the license can expire makes it so that the game is no longer available if the contract isn't renewed. This happened with Wallace & Gromit's Grand Adventures and Law & Order: Legacies. Luckily those two games were released for PC at retail, so they aren't completely gone forever. However, if Telltale loses the rights to Puzzle Agent 2, Hector: Badge of Carnage, or the Poker Night games, they'll be gone forever since they were only ever released digitally.

    If you worked on your own intellectual property, you would be the one who would dictate when a sequel would be made, or how long it would be available for sale in the marketplace.

    They're still pretty much spin-offs either way, but I wasn't complaining about that. I was wondering why it's such a big deal to him. I don't understand why making new content in established universes is supposedly such a bad thing.

  • I want some of the Telltale staff to get in a room and do a reaction video to this.

  • It's all true.

  • I thought this was going to be funny.

  • Your posts are great and filled with wisdom :x - have a cookie -

    Deltino posted: »

    I feel the biggest mistake anyone makes regarding Telltale is treating them like any old video game developer, and more importantl

  • edited December 2015

    I wonder if any Telltale staff saw this video and what they must have thought about it...

    ALSO - Is Kevin Bruner really like that?

  • It still got over 4000 likes and less than 400 dislikes.

    AgentZ46 posted: »

    Yuck. Edit: I literally watched it up to 1:10 and couldn't bear to listen to that bullshit any longer.

  • You don't have to keep bumping this thread. It was posted a while back now.

    Harian96 posted: »

    It still got over 4000 likes and less than 400 dislikes.

  • This is just the same as honest trailers. A bunch of viewers ask a guy to put their personal feelings towards a film to the side, and do a "review" in a comedic character. This video is supposed to be critical, but may not reflect what the guy actually thinks, and a portion of the video likes will be because they found the video funny, not because it's a well structured argument.

  • By this guy's logic the entire Star Wars EU doesn't have any creative or original stories. The Telltale Walking Dead is its own story with its own characters, for many people like myself when they think of Walking Dead there mind goes to the Telltale game before it goes to the comics or TV show. This guy could have a point if it was a spinoff with characters we already knew like Wolf Among Us, but he doesn't have a leg to stand when its an original cast of characters in different situations.

  • The best part of the video is when he questions whether Mine Craft really needed a story mode.

    No, it didn't.

  • So?

    Harian96 posted: »

    It still got over 4000 likes and less than 400 dislikes.

  • This thread is a month old. It doesn't need to keep being bumped.

This discussion has been closed.