User Avatar Image

Welcome!

posted by David E Telltale Alumni on - last edited - Viewed by 14.4K users
Thanks for ordering Sam & Max: The Devil's Playhouse, and welcome to the private pre-orderers discussion forum!

This is the exclusive location to chat with the team behind the latest Sam & Max season, and amass all kinds of secret knowledge related to the upcoming games, so that you can lord it over your less-informed friends. Join us!
558 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • Well, okay then. Until some Q&A topics show up, I hereby announce Avistew Q&A. Ask all your questions about the French!

    1. I'm a huge movie buff and I love film. What are the greatest accomplishments in French films and can you recommend some good films to watch. The only French film I've seen is Joyeux Noel, but I'll watch anything NOT horror. I want to watch more foreign films though and would love to know more about French films in general.

    2. Get rid of my American preconceptions about French food. You guys don't just eat escargo(sp?) and pate all day, right? So what are some dishes that you think define your country instead of those.

    3. Does France have much to do with the French section of Belgium, and is that section of Belgium much like France at all?

    4. Your country is stereotyped here for being a lot more laid back about things like nudity and sex than we are. (I hope this isn't an offensive question, but if the French stereotype has any truth to it, it shouldn't be) Is that true, and why is that? And what are some things that DO offend the French? Are the French very patriotic, or do they have a lot of problems in the government and country at the moment?

    5. The American stereotype for the French, none of which is likely, outside of those mentioned, is that the French are romantic, art lovers, and have the most beautiful women in Europe, most of whom are maids. Then again our stereotype for the British is that they drink tea, say wot wot and jolly good show all day, have twirly moustaches and top hats, and read Austen and Longfellow by the fireside every day. Whereas the British stereotype for the British is binge drinking, football crazed nuts who go outside in their underwear and shout who knows what at people, or so I've been told. What is the French view of or stereotype of the French? Because I'd rather view your people as what they are then what I'm told they are by Hollywood.
  • Secret Fawful;271142 said:
    Well, okay then. Until some Q&A topics show up, I hereby announce Avistew Q&A. Ask all your questions about the French!
    Haha fine by me :)
    Secret Fawful;271142 said:
    1. I'm a huge movie buff and I love film. What are the greatest accomplishments in French films and can you recommend some good films to watch.
    Well, I can't pretend to know all French movies by a long shot, but I'll give you some that I liked.

    Amelie is actually famous outside of France. It's a romantic comedy that I really liked, it had something magical to it. To me, it's an example of how to use special effects properly: not for showing off, but for giving a whole atmosphere and moving along the story.

    By the same director, Delicatessen is about a post-apocalyptic France where people of a building kill and eat their building managers, and The City of Lost Children is about a man who can't dream and kidnaps children to steal their dreams. They're afraid of him, though, so they only have nightmares. I haven't seen that last one but heard great things about it.

    A comedy that I really liked was Asterix & Obelix: Mission Cleopatra. Based off the book but with some more modern jokes. Not all translate well but I'd say it's still entertaining in English/with English subtitles (the dubbed version is cut, though).

    I also like comedies by Francis Veber. I'd suggest The Dinner Game, about a man who invites a stupid man for a game (they all have to invite the most stupid guy they can) and gets stuck with him and The Closet, about a man who works for a condom factory and pretends to be gay so he won't be fired.
    My favourite by that director, "Tais-toi !" ("Shut up!"), doesn't seem to be available either dubbed or subtitled in English, unfortunately.

    ... That's off the top of my head and only reflects my personal tastes. If you're more interested in an artsy point of view I'm not the right person to ask though.
    Secret Fawful;271142 said:
    2. Get rid of my American preconceptions about French food. You guys don't just eat escargo(sp?) and pate all day, right? So what are some dishes that you think define your country instead of those.
    It's escargot, which means snail. We're not fussy about calling things what they are, the name of the animal is the name of the meat, too.
    As far as very French foods go, I can think of cassoulet, a dish of duck and white beans as tasty as it looks disgusting, and ratatouille, a casserole of tomatoes, eggplant and ******** made famous abroad by the movie of the same name. Both a peasant food and very traditional. There is also pot-au-feu, a French beef stew, and Boeuf Bourguignon, another beef stew but cooked in wine.
    Other childhood favourites include meat fondue (you put oil in the fondue dish and dip raw meat in it to cook it) and raclette, a winter meal revolving around cheese.
    Some other French foods are famous abroad, such as crêpes for instance. There are actually crêpe stands in France similar to hot dog/pretzel stands in the US.
    As a vegetarian (and now allergic to milk), I have to point out that France isn't vegetarian-friendly at all. It's seen as an insult to France's heritage and culture to refuse to eat some of its most traditional dishes.
    Secret Fawful;271142 said:
    3. Does France have much to do with the French section of Belgium, and is that section of Belgium much like France at all?
    Well, it borders France. As a result people from the North of France have expressions also used in Belgium but not in the rest of France for instance. And it's pretty much a free border, you can drive there and shop and come back.
    It has many similarities with France, culturally and with the language, which of course is also the same, but it has differences too. I'd say it's pretty similar to the US vs Canada.
    Secret Fawful;271142 said:
    4. Your country is stereotyped here for being a lot more laid back about things like nudity and sex than we are. Is that true, and why is that? And what are some things that DO offend the French? Are the French very patriotic, or do they have a lot of problems in the government and country at the moment?
    Nudity is definitely not a problem. It's not illegal to be naked in public, except if you're waiting in front of a school or something, and movies that have full frontal nudity can still get rated for everyone. France has a big difference between sexual and non-sexual nudity, a concept that seems lost in North America.
    Basically, where it seems nudity is always considered sexual in the US, in France it's only considered sexual in some circonstances, depending on position of the body and other things (for instance for a man it's pretty obvious what would be considered sexual nudity).
    I think you have to see it the other way around, "why is nudity a problem in the US", and that's linked to puritanism I think. We didn't have that in France.
    Think about all the naked sculptures and paintings. Obviously nudity wasn't a problem then. We still grow up going to museums that are full of naked people so it's really part of our culture I think.
    The French aren't generally very patriotic in the American sense. I don't think you'd see many French people say they love their country or something like that because it seems so abstract, you walk two steps and you're in another country. But things like culture, they get very attached to and proud of it.
    The government right now doesn't have that much support. Sarkozy is pretty right-wing for France, even if he'd probably be a Democrat by American standards. He's made some pretty big changes in the way things are done and isn't too fond of waiting for the people to give their opinion, or caring about their disagreeing. And the French do like disagreeing publicly, there are demonstrations all the time. I'd say the French generally don't like change very much.

    But it's nothing as bad as Bush was in the US for instance.
    Secret Fawful;271142 said:
    5. The American stereotype for the French, none of which is likely, outside of those mentioned, is that the French are romantic, art lovers, and have the most beautiful women in Europe, most of whom are maids. French view of or stereotype of the French? Because I'd rather view your people as what they are then what I'm told they are by Hollywood.
    Hum, I'm not sure about the "French view of the French", but my view of the French, if I was to generalise, would be people who are proud and don't want to be considered inferior, but can be very nice. What I mean is if you go to France and try to speak French a bit, even a few words, people will be nice and help you in English because they'll feel respected. If you only speak English however they'll feel like you assume they have to learn your language and might get upset.
    Apart from that, I'm not quite sure I've notice much difference with people from everywhere else... Mhh, good focus on entertainment in general. Food, sex, or just relaxing, it's considered more important to know how to enjoy life than to be a workaholic, I'd say French people are less stressed out about things like that. Maybe that's why we have a reputation to be lazy.
    On the other hand French people can get very attached to their privileges, and they'll complain a LOT if someone tries to take them away. This being said, it usually works, so...

    EDIT: I almost forgot! Same old song is one of my favourite movies. It's mostly about everyday life stuff (although you know, stuff does happen) but the catch is that the characters suddenly break into song from time to time. They're actually just mouthing it and French songs are played with the original singer. Nobody takes notice of it.
    Probably of less interest to someone who isn't French but I really liked it.
    Plus I like stories that are just "everyday life" where there isn't a single main characters but several lives crossing each other's path.
  • Did I see grandpa stinky and girl stinky in the picture? (the one with the line of villians). I knew they were evil ever since they serve that honey bee wax banana juice without the honey I mean seriously no honey?!:mad:

    They keep making that same mistake for three months without refunds or add it in without paying additional $4.
  • Hmmmm...that makes me wonder what we will learn this season...
  • Probably lots of things. It looks like it's got a pretty interesting plot.
  • Well, I can't come up with an excuse to post, so I'll just agree with all those who said: "Woo!".

    Woo!
  • rabbity;271238 said:
    Well, I can't come up with an excuse to post, so I'll just agree with all those who said: "Woo!".

    Woo!
    You don't need an excuse to post here. Or if you do I'm in trouble.
  • avistew;271239 said:
    You don't need an excuse to post here. Or if you do I'm in trouble.
    That's good, because I don't actually have any leather jackets.
  • Dang....I was going to ask if you were selling any.
Add Comment