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Morgan Le fay?

posted by Doomduck on - last edited - Viewed by 1.4K users
Did you guys know that there is a person named Morgan Le Fay..?
http://no.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morgan_le_Fay
Morgan Leflay's name is obiously based this person..

Just wondering if this is something that was not known, sorry if this is common knowledge.. Did a quick search but it said "Le" and "fay" were both to short or something so it only searched on "Morgan"

:o:confused:

EDIT: Sorry, didn't realize i linked the Norwegian wiki page xD
There is a link to the english one below..
31 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • mgrant;395461 said:
    Perhaps, perhaps not. The Vulgate Morgan Le Fay is the most well known variant of the figure, I'll readily admit that, but I don't know if the half-sister bit is really the most memorable bit of the character. Morgan's been the mystical Arthurian antagonist for most of her modern culture appearances.

    Morgan's sister, Morgause (Arthur's other half sister) is the incestuous one. She's the one that slept with Arthur and begat Mordred.
    It could be just what you said, but could just as easily be more to it as well. I guess only time will tell (hopefully they will make another game soon;)). I didn't even realise morgana from Camelot was called Morgan Le fay, until today. When i heard the name I recognized it instantly, and it just made me wonder why they used that name. Plus they left it open for her character to have big role in the next one i think, so maybe there is more for us to learn about her character. Hmm...maybe the vodo lady is called Morgause LOL!!
  • I got the reference from Arthurian legend the second I saw the flyer in chapter one. And being a big fan of Stargate I immediately recognized it of course. Morgan Le Fay plays a big part in season 10, assisting the main characters in finding Merlin which enables them to complete the weapon capable of destroying ascended beings.
    She also makes an appearance in the first movie "The Ark of Truth".
  • Anne26;395474 said:
    Hmm...maybe the vodo lady is called Morgause LOL!!

    OK, so that makes Morgan, Elaine, *and* the Voodoo Lady all sisters... That Captain Marley sure got around.
  • FitzoliverJ;395770 said:
    OK, so that makes Morgan, Elaine, *and* the Voodoo Lady all sisters... That Captain Marley sure got around.
    yeah looks that way;) LOL
  • FitzoliverJ;395770 said:
    OK, so that makes Morgan, Elaine, *and* the Voodoo Lady all sisters... That Captain Marley sure got around.
    So did Uther Pendragon. Hey-o!


    But in all seriousness that would get a little weird, particularly if Guybrush is the "Arthur" figure in all this.
  • Molokov;194145 said:
    When I found out the pirate hunter's name was Morgan leFlay in episode one.... I figured it was probably a woman despite the characters using a male pronoun.

    After all, Morgan LeFay is pretty much the villian in Arthurian Legend (Mordred notwithstanding).

    So when there was all this wonderful speculation between Eps 1 and 2 as in "who is this woman who is holding Guybrush at swordpoint????" I was thinking (but didn't post) that it was probably the pirate hunter Morgan leFlay.... but everyone else seemed convinced it had to be one of the old MI chararacters returning (Kate, Carla) so it was still interesting to see the debate rage on.
    personally i knew it was morgan leflay at the end... but i seriously thought it was kate capsize with a change in name...
  • mgrant;395452 said:
    (incoming Celtic/Medieval nerd mode)

    Actually, Morgan Le Fay (literally meaning "the fae" or fairy) was based on an earlier Celtic figure by the name of Morrigan. Morrigan, also known as the Washer at The Ford, was a goddess of battle and often appeared in the form of a raven. In The Táin Bó Cúailnge she lands on the shoulder of Cú Chulainn to signify his death. The battle goddess association is quite fitting for a combat focused character such as Morgan Le FLay.
    I thought that Morgan is more often associated with Welsh Modron than Irish Morrigan. While Morgan and Morrigan share some similarities there are many scholars who think that they are different characters.
  • Olaus Petrus;396138 said:
    I thought that Morgan is more often associated with Welsh Modron than Irish Morrigan. While Morgan and Morrigan share some similarities there are many scholars who think that they are different characters.
    That's still debatable actually. While you're right, there is a speculated association with Modron, there's a question if Morgan Le Fay draws on both the traditions of Modron and Morrigan or simply bears similarities by chance. Given there are very early Arthurian myths coming out of both Wales and Ireland, it's a little hard to be sure what take on the Morgan Le Fay figure of the later myths is accurate

    It's actually quite an interesting dialog, similar to the discussion of The Celtic aspects of Gawain, Merlin and Guinevere (or, as Geoffrey of Monmouth calls here, Gwehyvar).

    Why, yes I am a huge fan of the Arthurian myths, why do you ask?
  • mgrant;396145 said:
    That's still debatable actually. While you're right, there is a speculated association with Modron, there's a question if Morgan Le Fay draws on both the traditions of Modron and Morrigan or simply bears similarities by chance. Given there are very early Arthurian myths coming out of both Wales and Ireland, it's a little hard to be sure what take on the Morgan Le Fay figure of the later myths is accurate

    It's actually quite an interesting dialog, similar to the discussion of The Celtic aspects of Gawain, Merlin and Guinevere (or, as Geoffrey of Monmouth calls here, Gwehyvar).

    Why, yes I am a huge fan of the Arthurian myths, why do you ask?
    True the question remains open. It's hard to say anything certain about the connections, because much of the Irish and Welsh mythology has been written down in rather late date and despite the fact that language of the stories is usually older than writing date some of the material might have changed during the centuries. Modron's connection to Urien and Ywain comes from the Welsh Triads and it's hard to say when the connection was first invented.
  • Olaus Petrus;396157 said:
    True the question remains open. It's hard to say anything certain about the connections, because much of the Irish and Welsh mythology has been written down in rather late date and despite the fact that language of the stories is usually older than writing date some of the material might have changed during the centuries. Modron's connection to Urien and Ywain comes from the Welsh Triads and it's hard to say when the connection was first invented.
    That's one of the problems of working with Celtic and Norse literature, I'm afraid. Much of the mythology and folklore has been lost so any argument made about their connections or influences on later works functions partially on assumptions.

    Even when there are strongly implied links (like Gwehyvar having been derived from the name of Mæve's daughter) are based on later works which, given both the tendency for the codex writers to edit what they were transcribing and the lateness of finished texts, it's never definite.
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