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Suzette: Could the new KQ be text?

posted by RAnthonyMahan on - last edited - Viewed by 928 users
Not sure if any of you remember this from a while back, but Telltale programmer Bruce Wilcox won last year's Loebner Prize (an annual award in artificial intelligence) for his chatbot Suzette. Shortly afterwards he made an interesting remark in this interview.

What do you see for the future of your bot or bots in general ?

Natural language is the way we should be interacting with computers, so my bot and others are just a step along the way. Scribblenauts is a game that allows a lot of nouns and adjectives and I'm working at TellTale games on a game that does nouns and verbs. All of this is going toward NL.


When he first said this, I was curious what game Telltale could be working on that could possibly benefit from chatbot technology. With Telltale's five new announcements, I remembered how the old King's Quest games were graphical text adventures. A text adventure would require a good parser able to recognize nouns and verbs and how they can be interchangeable. (For example, in a well-programmed text adventure, "GET ITEM" and "TAKE ITEM" should do the same thing.)

I know it's unlikely (especially since it would make porting the game to consoles a bitch), but maybe the new King's Quest game could be a text adventure too?
17 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • I'm kind of hoping this is the case...
  • That would be pretty awesome, especially if more natural language understanding was infused. Sierra was always a fair bit behind the likes of Infocom in that regard.
  • A real King's Quest game needs a text parser. How else would you "throw baby" in this game?
  • The game will be "multiplatform". A text parser wouldn't work for the filthy console masses.
  • Scribblenauts got away with a parser, and it was a DS game.

    Edit: (Granted, the imperative sentences people would have to input into an adventure game parser who be longer than the adjective-noun phrases the Scribblenauts games use, but would it be that much more tedious?)
  • The inclusion of the ability to type in commands would be cool, but not if it comes at the expense of a more point and click type interface, or whatever else they have in mind.
  • thesporkman;454624 said:
    Scribblenauts got away with a parser, and it was a DS game.

    Edit: (Granted, the imperative sentences people would have to input into an adventure game parser who be longer than the adjective-noun phrases the Scribblenauts games use, but would it be that much more tedious?)
    Being a DS game is why Scribblenauts was able to get away with a text parser. The Touch Screen allowed for an easy-to-use keyboard for inputting words.

    If you've ever tried entering a Wii Friend Code or registering an Xbox Live gamertag, you'd know inputting text on actual consoles is just a pain.

    If you want an idea on what a text adventure on a console would be like, the first Zork game is included as an Easter egg in Call of Duty: Black Ops. A cool addition for the PC version, where you have a real keyboard to easily input commands. On the consoles...not so much.
  • There is no way in a million years Telltale would use a parser interface. That would alienate their key demographic, which is people who aren't smart enough to read or type.
  • Lambonius;454722 said:
    There is no way in a million years Telltale would use a parser interface. That would alienate their key demographic, which is people who aren't smart enough to read or type.
    And yet you're on these forums.
  • DAISHI;454729 said:
    And yet you're on these forums.
    I was just joking, dude. Making light of the common complaint about Telltale dumbing down their games' difficulty for "casual players." ;)
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