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King's Quest NEEDS to have deaths.

posted by David J Prokopetz on - last edited - Viewed by 3.6K users
There needs to be at least one way to trigger an elaborate and utterly arbitrary death cutscene on every single screen.

Am I wrong? :D

(Bonus points if the narrator mocks your corpse with cheesy wordplay afterwards.)
94 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • There seem to be a lot of KQ5 lovers on this board. Honestly, while I like all of the games, KQ5 annoys and frustrates me the most.

    In addition to the grating voices, illogical puzzles, and frequent dead ends, what I like least about it is that there are NO alternate solutions to puzzles, no alternate paths. Everything HAS to be done. There's no wiggle room; no way to beat the game without full points. I realize this isn't the only game with that problem, but it hits the hardest because this is a world that I'd really like to explore beyond the necessary path.

    It has beautiful artwork, some great music, and a decent story (although Graham's characterization and attitude is hilariously inconsistent), but it's very flawed.
  • KQ5 was the first Sierra game I ever played. Mostly because of the amateurish and silly voices and mediocre writing, I remember being confounded as to how the KQ series could be so popular and beloved. But it quickly grew on me as I played (to the point where I almost freaked out when the Harpies attacked Cedric -- while I enjoy the humor of the game-over screens when Graham dies, I didn't want to see a death scene for a cute kind-hearted little owl, no matter how annoying his voice is :p ). The puzzles are what kept me playing; I thought they were mostly logical or well-clued, with maybe one or two exceptions. I played KQ6 soon after and I'd say it's a better game, with deeper gameplay and storyline, better writing, plus I really liked the spells and the wordplay puzzles. But KQ5 has a charm of its own that makes it easy for me to overlook any flaws.
  • They could have a part where Graham finds a PC with Leisure Suit Larry Box Office Bust playing and he RAGES and punches the screen and electrocutes himself.
  • I personally prefer the oveall story atmosphere of KQ5. The puzzles may have been frustrating (not to me) but if there was a more KQ5-themed KQ game with the puzzle and character approach of KQ6 it'd probably be the perfect KQ game.
    doggans;461957 said:
    It has beautiful artwork, some great music, and a decent story (although Graham's characterization and attitude is hilariously inconsistent), but it's very flawed.
    Well, Josh Mandel (the voice of Graham) wanted to have more consistency in his lines in relation to the scenario. But the voice director told him that "Graham is always buff" and wouldn't let him.
  • MusicallyInspired;462008 said:
    I personally prefer the oveall story atmosphere to KQ5. The puzzles may have been frustrating (not to me) but if there was a more KQ5-themed KQ game with the puzzle and character approach of KQ6 it'd probably be the perfect KQ game.



    Well, Josh Mandel (the voice of Graham) wanted to have more consistency in his lines in relation to the scenario. But the voice director told him that "Graham is always buff" and wouldn't let him.
    I'm in total agreement with you on this--It comes very close to being the perfect KQ, and beyond that, it's a great, engaging fantasy world. It draws you in. Much more than any of the other games. A refined KQ5 would indeed be the perfect KQ game.

    And I feel that Josh Mandel IS Graham. Seriously, I'd have a hard time accepting any substitutions for him. To me, Josh is like the Sean Connery of the KQ series; Yes, you can replace him with a great actor, but Connery will always BE Bond, regardless of who's in his shoes at the moment.
  • Hm. Marquilin raises a good point. What's the point of dying if it won't bring consequence? To remain in the spirit of King's Quest, I suppose?
    Well, imagine Graham walking up to an evil bridge troll, and the evil bridge troll picking him up and throwing him in the water. You can "try again" all you want, but that bridge troll will just keep making good on his threats.

    Now imagine Graham walking up to the same bridge troll over and over again, only instead of following through on his threats, the bridge troll just keeps telling him to go find something that will draw interest but have no real use.

    That second one doesn't happen because Graham isn't Guybrush Threepwood. Guybrush uses his sense of humor and self-preservation as a means of avoiding death - as of where Graham will walk straight into danger. And seeing those deaths can also be considered more realistic (and sometimes more entertaining) than watching an infinite loop of the hero surviving. Just look at some scenes from BTTF - Kid Tannen can shoot at Marty forever and never once hit him. A death scene can help to break up the monotony (and sometimes provide a funny death sequence.) So I'd think of it as more of a mini-consequence as opposed to controlling an invincible character.
  • MusicallyInspired;462008 said:
    Well, Josh Mandel (the voice of Graham) wanted to have more consistency in his lines in relation to the scenario. But the voice director told him that "Graham is always buff" and wouldn't let him.
    I don't fault Josh Mandel, who gives the best performance in the game. But it's still hilarious how he'll be humble and resist taking the very useful tools from the shoemakers until they insist, and yet he DEMANDS a marionette from a gnome. :P
  • Datadog;462036 said:
    ... A death scene can help to break up the monotony (and sometimes provide a funny death sequence.) So I'd think of it as more of a mini-consequence as opposed to controlling an invincible character.
    Indeed, I consider death sequences mini-rewards - you get to see content and physical action that would otherwise not be there for you to enjoy.

    They can also be seen as a form of mini-mini-branching - the deadly branches are very short, but they are there, complementing the main path.
  • In addition to the grating voices, illogical puzzles, and frequent dead ends, what I like least about it is that there are NO alternate solutions to puzzles, no alternate paths. Everything HAS to be done. There's no wiggle room; no way to beat the game without full points. I realize this isn't the only game with that problem, but it hits the hardest because this is a world that I'd really like to explore beyond the necessary path.
    Ahh well I seem to recall you don't have to use the peas on the monster, and thus you don't necessarily have to put the cat in the bag. That will lead to a incomplete score.

    I've never tried it to see what it leads to, but there are a cople of alternate puzzle solutions such as thowing the boot at the dog, and the stick a the cat. Not sure if that changes the score or not.

    In most cases doing an alternate trading solution ends to a dead end and death later in the game right?
  • I am one of the persons who loved both Sierra and Lucasarts gameplay for both had their own uniqueness. Even though I am certain a lot might dissagree, I believe that staying true to the original franchise should be really looked into especially the absurd deaths! I can believe how many times I laughed my ass out after dying for something so small! Of course I understand that a lot of people got frustrated by this but I found Sierra gameplay more challenging for the hardcore adventurer. What do other people think?
    Demetris
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