User Avatar Image

Can Telltale fix this game?

posted by ElWaster on - last edited - Viewed by 4.1K users
I have played the first one on the iPhone, and although it's a good adventure game, keeps to classic point and click play that was made famous all those years ago, but the language in it does make me cringe.. I've got nothing against bad language, but it seemed that in episode 1, they rely on the language way too much to boost laughs when a perfectly good, witty and playable game is already present.

I hope Telltale get to throw in some of their own formulas and turn an average game into a great one! I have every faith in them.:D
47 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • I don't think bleeping it would work anyway or you would be hearing BEEP every 5 seconds
  • coolsome;470310 said:
    I don't think bleeping it would work anyway or you would be hearing BEEP every 5 seconds
    Worked for Tiny Timmy in Sam & Max Season 2! :)

    I'm agreeing with the majority that there are plenty of family-friendly games out there if that's what you're looking for. This one specifically warns that it's not for kids. Don't play it if you're not into "those" kinds of games.
  • I demand a censored GTA!
  • Yeah, and a Back to the Future GTA style censored one, too.
  • Censorship does work when it's unnecessary.
  • I played through the whole game and I found the swearing to be very funny and, usually, in-context. Overall, great game, can't wait for episode 2!
  • In a console driven world, it's really great to see a game that doesn't have to mold itself into the confines of MS, Sony, and Nintendo rules to be released.
  • What rules? Its the ESRB they have to appease.
  • ScreamingFalcon;475642 said:
    What rules? Its the ESRB they have to appease.

    If you had a fourth wall joke isnulting the ESRB board but it didn't have over the top swears would they be able to tell you to take it out?
  • User Avatar Image
    Tor
    ScreamingFalcon;475642 said:
    What rules? Its the ESRB they have to appease.
    I think video game ratings (such as ESRB and the European equivalent PEGI) are actually voluntary in most countries. Mainstream publishers usually choose to use them though.

    The big console companies each have their own rules for what game content they allow on their platforms. Since they have complete control over their platforms, they are able to prevent games that don't follow the rules from being published. So following the content guidelines for the platform you are publishing for is actually more important than following the ESRB content guidelines.

    A couple of examples of console censorship:
    - Nintendo of America was notoriously strict back in the NES/SNES days, lots of examples here (a couple of Wii and DS games even).
    - Microsoft apparently has problems with certain types of content in Xbox Live indie games, such as nazi killing (a wholesome activity, if there ever was one) and sexual education.

    Contrast that with the PC... nobody owns the PC platform so you can publish whatever content you want for it.
Add Comment